Teach Your Kids Gratitude This Thanksgiving

Teach Your Kids Gratitude This Thanksgiving

Teach Your Kids Gratitude This Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving is the perfect time to share a scrumptious, hearty meal, gather with loved ones, and give thanks for all the good in our lives. This holiday is the best opportunity to teach children about what this holiday represents: gratitude. We all desire to raise children who are kind, loving, productive, and responsible. Gratitude is also good for our personal mental health and well-being. There are so many ways that you can practice gratitude with your children on Thanksgiving and beyond. 

Practicing gratitude isn’t just about recognizing the good in your own life, but extending it to others who are less fortunate than you. You can have your kids collect items from their rooms that aren’t being used and drop them off at a homeless shelter, bring cans and essential items to a food bank, volunteer at a soup kitchen, or visit nursing home residents (who suffer from loneliness and isolation). The possibilities are endless. It will help them appreciate the many blessings and riches they have in their lives.

Other ideas that families can do together: participate in a Neighborhood Clean-Up and Create Care Packages. Keeping a community clean is a group effort and participating in a community clean-up is a great way to give back to your community and bond with others. Neighborhood clean-ups may be held at parks, beaches, or along the sidewalks. Care packages for home bound seniors, the military abroad or for your local church.

You can even order a pizza or cake to send to your local firehouse or police station. Send your local nurses' association a gift basket. It’s a perfect time to show essential workers how much you care, that their pandemic efforts are not forgotten, and how well you understand how important they are to the community.

Write Thank You Notes is another way to show your kids how being grateful is being kind to others to let them know they are doing a great job or have really helped you in your life. Besides essential workers, there are so many people in your children’s lives who they might wish to thank. There is nothing more heartwarming than writing a thank you note. Have your child write one to their teachers, a grandparent, a helpful neighbor, clergyperson, or a friend.

Remember, too, that practicing gratitude isn’t something that should be confined to Thanksgiving. It means giving back whenever possible, donating time and money to help those in need, and appreciating the people in their lives and community who keep things running smoothly. What’s more, regularly practicing gratitude is good for the whole family. It also helps to make the world a better place. You can start your family’s journey toward infusing more gratitude into your lives this Thanksgiving, and then make it a practice all year long.